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Bamboo reduces risks of climate hazards in Madagascar

Today ministers from around the world meet in Morocco at the climate conference COP22. Madagascar is one of the most vulnerable countries in terms of climate hazards. ICCO started a project in the southeast region of Madagascar aiming to reduce risks of climate disasters.

Today ministers from around the world meet in Morocco at the climate conference COP22. From the Netherlands, minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation Ploumen is present. The minister meets African countries to support farmers in Africa with the rearing of bamboo. This is a way to counteract deforestation and at the same time it generated incomes for farmers. ICCO has experience with these kinds of activities in Madagascar, where bamboo is promoted in order to avoid further erosion.

Madagascar is one of the most vulnerable countries in terms of climate hazards. Tropical cyclones followed by great floods crack down the eastern part of Madagascar and trigger important damages. As for the southern part of the country, it is semi-dessert with only 300 mm rainfall per year. This zone is subjected to the El Niño phenomenon. ICCO believes that with an environmental approach, climate disaster consequences can be limited.

Reducing risks of climate disasters in Madagascar

At the end of 2015 ICCO started a project in the southeast region of Madagascar aiming to reduce risks of climate disasters. Damage to the coastal zone is often caused by environmental degradation due to vegetation in the landward forest areas. Because of this, soil defense and restoration activities have been promoted in mountainous forest areas in collaboration with the local communities. Twelve showcase sites were established. Hundreds of bamboo and other anti-erosion plants grow now at the shore of the river, to avoid the enlargement of the river. 120 thousands species of plants such as Vetiver have been planted to protect watersheds against erosion. Besides, three big plant nurseries were created and 100 young plants will be distributed to community members.

Partner Tandavanala

The project is carried out by our partner Tandavanala, which is a non-governmental organization in Madagascar established in 2003. For this project, Tandavanala has trained 50 local communities with more than 500 members in risk and natural disaster management. The NGO supports them with capacity building, organization and equipment.